NGHTMRE Releases ‘UNSOUND’ EP, A Prelude To His Upcoming Album


After capping an exciting year with “Shady Intentions,” NGHTMRE continues the momentum and kicks off 2022 with his first EP release since 2017. Four tracks deep and chock-full of features, UNSOUND travels NGHTMRE’s evolution of sound since his inception. Including genre-bending collaborations with rising producers RNSOM, RAY VOLPE, and Deadlyft, UNSOUND is the third installment to NGHTMRE’s long line of triumphant EPs.

“The UNSOUND EP is a bit of a preface for my upcoming album. I have been working on lots of new music throughout the year and these are some of my favorite collaborations I’ve done! I think the EP has a perfect balance of heavy, festival-ready tunes, as well as some more easy listening melodic. Everyone who worked on this EP is incredibly talented and I think deserves more recognition for their work. I hope this EP brings to light some of the amazing under-appreciated artists who helped write this music.” – NGHTMRE

Listen below!



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

Album Review: COMEBACK KID Heavy Steps


The enduring might of Canucklehead hardcore heroes Comeback Kid exists because of a variety of factors. The quintet hails from Winnipeg where, when the temperature at the intersection of Portage and Main gets to 50 below (and it does!), you stay inside and rock n’ roll. And when you’ve had enough of the four walls and beer-and-black mold rehearsal room scent, one can choose to decamp to the four walls and fart-and-armpit scent of a tour van. Which is what Comeback Kid have done like clockwork since forming in 2002. Originally, coming together as a side project, the band has issued seven brick-solid albums and backed them up with an impressive ledger of touring that has spanned here, there and everywhere borders were open and visas could be applied for.

metal injection comeback kid band

If anything, you have to give them props for surviving being signed to Victory Records and their on-and-off-again business model for the time period from 2005’s Wake the Dead to 2014’s Die Knowing and the two albums in between. Looking at the chart numbers, in hindsight, their emerging relatively unscathed from that decade likely had much to do with them being one of the label’s cash-cows. And how did that come to be? By creating a perfect storm of thrash metal, melodic punk and NYHC all whipped together by Andrew Neufeld‘s unmistakable banshee with a pack-a-day habit rasp which he twists and turns into some of the most infectious, fist-pumping and euphoric vocal phrasing the genre has ever heard. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Heavy Steps is their second record for Nuclear Blast and continues the tradition of force feeding Slayer and healthy helpings of Bay Area guitar riffology into a melodic wringer kissed by the southern California sun and chewed on by New York City rats, with beats and rhythms patterns influenced by fellow warriors of ice Sacrifice and Propagandhi. And then there’s Neufeld, expressing the sort of irascibility you’d expect anyone who’s read the news at any point in the past 40 years alongside the sort of en masse joyous roar you hear from English football supporters when the World Cup final falls on a bank holiday. When the title track kicks in with a riff that’s shifty and clobbering at the same time before making the seemingly dichotomous leap to mellifluous two-step thrashing punk, it’s the frontman’s agile and seamless shift between hard charge and a welcoming vocal bear hug that helps the songs’ movement from post-Reign in Blood Slayer to Hatebreed to Sick Of It All to Strung Out as delivered by bassist Chase Brenneman, drummer Loren Legare and guitarists Jeremy Hiebert and Stu Ross. Not only does this track open the album, but it delivers a definitive parry distinguishing Comeback Kid from peers and pretenders. Together, the transitions are made smooth, natural and, ultimately, the sort of thing thousands will be bouncing and singing along to in European farmer’s fields and American dust bowls when that becomes a thing again.

Take a gander at the many videos posted online of the band’s set from the most recent Furnace Fest to pay witness to the fact that writing sing-a-long, pit-stirring anthems has long been part of the Comeback Kid methodology. Heavy Steps steers that ability into new directions. There’s a maturity to this album that sharp-eared listeners will cotton on to while thick-necked mosh pit denizens will continue to hear ripping musical accompaniment to the bouncing of their flabby, XXL-sized guts off of one another. “No Easy Way Out” does all of the above with the inclusion of a jazzy breakbeat breakdown and some crafty wah-wah pedal bluesiness that’s simultaneously blue collar rallying cry and raised pinky, sweater vest intelligence. Similarly, “Face the Fire” tempers it’s classic Bad Religion linearity with angelic backing vocals and “Crossed” appears to take lessons from its featured guest (Gojira‘s Joe Duplantier) as staccato pauses are massaged into its mix of Seasons in the Abyss, Destroy the Machines and Cause for Alarm, whereas “Everything Relates” brims with melodic warmth and a radio-ready chorus that will sadly never be heard on anything but college and internet radio. 

For those looking to strictly have their faces caved in without frills and diversions, more traditional fare exists throughout the album’s middle third with the mid-paced vintage Metallica-meets-vintage Epitaph Records stomp of “Dead on the Fence,” the coruscating, galloping riff work and gang vocals of the bruising “Shadow of Doubt” and the down-picked crunch and Italian punk references powering “True to Form” and “In Between.” 

Quite often, folks on the metal side of the extreme music spectrum undeservedly point fingers at the supposed limits of hardcore punk. Heavy Steps acts a beacon of how to bolster one’s own basics and starting points so as to inject new life into one’s own sound and the scene at large. All while staying true to both sound and scene.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

Urbanstep Drops 17 Track Groundbreaking Album, ‘Stages’


We are always massive fans of diverse sound design and super innovative production. Today, we have the privilege to share with you guys the latest album from Urbanstep, ‘STAGES’. This multi genre album takes the listener on an mind-bending and genre redefining experience from rock, to hiphop to trap production. Urban step comments on the album’s creation:

‘This album is a massive concept that was systematically created, polished and released throughout a year as singles & EPs that formed main thought and the idea of the overall message of the album. I wanted to tell a story of both myself & the state of this day and age society. Some thoughts are depicted in vocal format, some are only instrumental.’

Recently nominated for Latvian Grammy, Urbanstep is making moves and definitely a name people should keep an eye on. Enjoy this profound body of sound design and mould breaking production.

 



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

SOM Streams Doomy, Poppy New Album The Shape Of Everything


Som will release their new album The Shape Of Everything on January 21, but why wait? Your speakers need to be destroyed and your ears infested with every earworm imaginable right this second! So go ahead and stream The Shape Of Everything below and get every single song stuck in your head. It’s absolutely worth it.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Pre-orders for The Shape Of Everything are available here.

Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter

Enter your e-mail below to get a daily update with all of our headlines.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

Album Review: BORIS W


When it comes to confounding and overwhelming the listener with a discography littered with a dizzying myriad of full-lengths, compilations, splits, EPs, collaborations, and altered/enhanced versions of the band all issued on various labels big and small and anything else you care to imagine and throw into the mix, Melvins take the cake. Taking a not-so-distant silver medal is Japanese trio Boris, a band with a history dating back to 1992 and a sound and direction so difficult to put a finger on that Metal Archives officially denotes their genre as “various.” If you do a random search on Boris, you’ll find the internet describing them as everything from an “experimental band” to simply “a musical group.” 

Boris Wata
Photo by Yoshihiro Mori

Now is not the time or place — and yours truly is not patient or intelligent enough — to make sense of Boris‘ skyscraping release stack with the band’s 27th (give or take whatever’s available to give and/or take) full-length on the table. In true-to-form fashion, this latest album isn’t even a standalone work given that it acts as a companion to its predecessor from 2020. Written as a quick response to the initial havoc the pandemic and its politicization was having on lives everywhere, NO was Boris shaking out all their doom sludge and hardcore punk tendencies. W, written on the back end of almost two years of life at a standstill, is the comparative, soothing foil to NO‘s harshness. And if you haven’t yet caught on, together the two album titles combine to spell “NOW,” a cheeky affirmation that these releases are a product of unprecedented times and the rollercoaster of emotions and bullshit therein. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

The final track on NO was called “Interlude,” which should have been the first hint something was up. What’s up is the melody from the closing moments of “Interlude” being shared with and opening W in the guise of “I Want To Go To The Side Where You Can Touch…,” an airy piece that floats between My Bloody Valentine soundscape and moaning Moog wash-outs. The ethereality of this track sets the tone for the majority of the rest of the record. Aside from the flourish of sprawling, Orange amp and pounding drum thunder that closed out “The Fallen,” the final Torche-like third of “Beyond Good and Evil” and the apprehensive stoner shuffle of “You Will Know (Ohayo Version),” this is Boris at their ambient, new age-y, humming, psychedelic, chamber orchestrated, chilled out-ness.  

There are moments where it feels like you’re being lovingly absorbed and enveloped by sound. “Icelina” combines Portishead sparsity with a dirty hippie pulling up a stool, an acoustic guitar, and a homemade pedalboard at a liberal arts college’s open mic night. “Drowning By Numbers” is reminiscent of Painkiller and Praxis exploring how to grate nervous systems with understated abrasion combined with insidious trip-hop rhythms. “Old Projector” conjures images of Enya jamming with Miranda Sex Garden. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there are swaths of stark minimalism and emptiness where it feels like you’re sitting back and waiting for something to happen, the contrast making things appear that much more minimal and empty. A track like “Invitation” comes across more like random noises than organized sound and “Jozan” is simply a one-minute and twenty-five-second cover of John Cage‘s “4:33.” 

How W lands will depend on where it lands. The segment of the public experiencing this record will be as important to its success as the content itself. Boris super-fans will continue to experience the breadth of the trio’s journey and worship accordingly. People who find that minimalism doesn’t push enough air to be stimulating will likely find this to be sonic wallpaper. The opposite should be true for fans of ambient music and active listeners who enjoy discovering the different tones, forms, and textures sound can take. Here’s how we’re hoping it falls: somehow, the booking agent gods figure a way to get Boris on tour with Blood Incantation so that both bands can do split sets consisting of their quiet and minimal moments buttressed up against their loud and distorted bombast. The dynamics would be mind-bending, just like Boris themselves continue to be.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / /

GHOST Streams “Call Me Little Sunshine,” Announces New Album Impera


After what feels like an eternity of waiting, Ghost is back with a new single “Call Me Little Sunshine” and a new record called Impera. “Call Me Little Sunshine” is definitely more in line with the heavy metal leanings of the first three Ghost albums, which is great! The video is creepy as hell, the riffs are certainly fit for stadiums, and the hooks are as hooky as they’ve ever been. Ghost is back, is what I’m getting at here.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Impera is due out March 11 and it’s probably safe to assume that the single is what Ghost will play tonight during their Jimmy Kimmel Live! performance. Pre-orders for Impera are available here and you catch Ghost at one of the dates below. But first, let’s take a look at the absolutely killer (and nightmarish) artwork for Impera.

w/ Volbeat & Twin Temple

1/25 – Reno, NV – Reno Events Center
1/27 – Seattle, WA – Climate Pledge Arena
1/28 – Nampa, ID – Ford Idaho Center Arena
1/29 – Portland, OR – Veterans Memorial Coliseum
1/31 – West Valley City, UT – Maverik Center
2/2 – Denver, CO – Ball Arena
2/4 – Lincoln, NE – Pinnacle Bank Arena
2/5 – Minneapolis, MN – Target Center
2/7 – Columbus, OH – Nationwide Arena
2/8 – Hershey, PA – GIANT Center
2/10 – Newark, NJ – Prudential Center
2/11 – Worcester, MA – DCU Center
2/12 – Camden, NJ – BB&T Pavilion
2/14 – Pittsburgh, PA – Petersen Events Center
2/15 – Toledo, OH – Huntington Center
2/16 – Grand Rapids, MI – Van Andel Arena
2/18 – Chicago, IL – Allstate Arena
2/19 – Cincinnati, OH – Heritage Bank Center
2/20 – Milwaukee, WI – Fiserv Forum
2/21 – St. Louis, MO – Chaifetz Arena
2/23 – Independence, MO – Cable Dahmer Arena
2/25 – Houston, TX – Smart Financial Centre at Sugar Land
2/26 – Dallas, TX – Fair Park Coliseum
2/28 – El Paso, TX – Don Haskins Center
3/1 – Phoenix, AZ – Footprint Center
3/3 – Anaheim, CA – Honda Center

w/ Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats & Twin Temple

4/9 – Manchester, Arena, UK
4/11 – London, O2 Arena, UK
4/13 – Glasgow, Hydro, UK
4/15 – Birmingham, RWA Arena, UK
4/17 – Rotterdam, RTM Stage Ahoy, Netherlands
4/18 – Paris, Accor Arena, France
4/19 – Cologne, Lanxess Arena, Germany
4/21 – Leipzig Quarterback Immobillen Arena, Germany
4/22 – Frankfurt, Festhalle, Germany
4/24 – Prague, Arena, Czech Republic
4/27 – Tampere, Nokia Arena, Finland
4/29 – Stockhom, Avicii Arena, Sweden
4/30 – Oslo, Spektrum, Norway
5/1 – Malmo, Malmo Arena, Sweden
5/3 – Brussels, Forest, Belgium
5/5 – Milan, Mediolanum Forum, Italy
5/7 – Barcelona, Olympic Arena Badalona, Spain
5/8 – Madrid, Vistalegre Arena, Spain
5/11 – Vienna, Stadthalle, Austria
5/13 – Zurich, Hallenstadion, Switzerland
5/15 – Hannover ZAG Arena, Germany
5/16 – Munich, Olympiahalle, Germany
5/18 – Budapest, Arena, Hungary

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter

Enter your e-mail below to get a daily update with all of our headlines.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

ORIGIN Recording First New Album Since 2017


2022 is about to get way more technical thanks to a brand new Origin album. The album is their first since Unparalleled Universe in 2017 (or first since the re-recording of the Abiogenesis material in 2019) and will most likely rip your face off. The new music should also incite some pillow fight mosh pits, which is the most important aspect of any new Origin music.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Anyway, stay tuned for maximum shred.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

KRALLICE Streams “Crystalline Exhaustion,” Announces New Album For Next Week


Surprise! There’s a new Krallice album called Crystalline Exhaustion due out digitally on January 28, with pre-orders for physical merch to start that same day through P2. You can check out the title track of the album below.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Crystalline Exhaustion is Krallice‘s third full-length album in three years, with their most recent effort Demonic Wealth being released last year on March 5.

Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter

Enter your e-mail below to get a daily update with all of our headlines.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

ANIMALS AS LEADERS To Play New Album & Classics On North American Tour


Animals As Leaders will hit the road on March 30 for a North American tour where they’ll perform two sets each night. The first set will feature the new album Parrhesia and the second set will feature a handful of classics.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

The tour will include a currently-unannounced special guest. Get the dates below. Animals As Leaders will release Parrhesia on March 25, which is available for pre-order here.

Mar 30 – Denver, CO @ Summit Music Hall
Apr 1 – Kansas City, MO @ Truman Theater *
Apr 2 – Omaha, NE @ Slowdown *
Apr 3 – Minneapolis, MN @ Varsity Theater
Apr 4 – Chicago, IL @ House of Blues
Apr 5 – Cincinnati, OH @ Bogarts
Apr 6 – Detroit, MI @ St. Andrews Hall
Apr 8 – Hampton Beach, NH @ Wally’s *
Apr 9 – Lititz, PA @ Mickey’s Black Box *
Apr 10 – New York, NY @ Irving Plaza
Apr 11 – Philadelphia, PA @ Brooklyn Bowl
Apr 12 – Boston, MA @ Big Night Live
Apr 13 – Baltimore, MD @ Baltimore Soundstage
Apr 15 – Atlanta, GA @ Buckhead Theatre
Apr 16 – Orlando, FL @ House of Blues
Apr 18 – Dallas, TX @ House of Blues
Apr 19 – Austin, TX @ Emo’s
Apr 21 – Phoenix, AZ @ Marquee Theater *
Apr 22 – Los Angeles, CA @ Theater At The Ace Hotel

*Not a Live Nation Date

Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter

Enter your e-mail below to get a daily update with all of our headlines.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

Album Review: TRENCHES Reckoner


Anyone with any interest in new Trenches material mostly likely ran out of Haste The Day puns after 14 years. Speaking of Haste The Day, Trenches originally formed after vocalist Jimmy Ryan left the aforementioned Christian metalcore band. The band’s 2008 debut The Tide Will Swallow Us Whole brought a hefty dose of post-rock and sludge metal to the metalcore style Ryan was known for. This was an uncommon sound for Tooth & Nail Records, essentially making these guys the equivalent of Isis or Cave In for youth group kids. Jokes aside, the record holds up after 14 years—certainly enough to keep fans clinging to every cryptic update about their second full-length. The release of Reckoner came like a thief in the night, and what a joyous return it is!

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

As the first fully fleshed-out Trenches single released in over a decade, “Eclipse” shows that the band isn’t overly concerned with capitalizing on “Jimmy Ryan’s in a post-metal band.” Actually, the song’s skronky syncopation steers closer to new Zao (no, not just Ryan‘s Carcass-y vocal rasps), delivered in under two minutes! Actually, Reckoner is under 40 minutes long, surprisingly short after so long to amass material. This puts a lot of weight on the strength of the chosen cuts. To that effect, “Eclipse” succeeds with its memorable chorus and infectious anger. These tracks were chosen for good reason.

269909777 597398668200304 9207565986487573757 n

Make no mistake, Trenches is still very much about the atmosphere. Opener “The Wrecking Age” may open with propulsive tom-toms and explosive riff changes, but the song’s unforgiving mosh part finds the perfect foil in a monolithic wave of sweeping chords and spacious precision. In the same way, “Horizons” comes off like the metalcore version of noisecore legends Today Is The Day, complete with a breakdown straight out of HTD’s 2004 album Burning Bridges, interspersed with noodling meditations more suited to math rock or even prog.

The charm of Reckoner manifests in that Trenches doesn’t sound like they’re trying to recapture their original sound. The combination of metalcore, sludge, and post-rock is there, but shorter cuts like “Ties That Bind” and “The Raging Sea” hit like a sucker punch for those expecting the moody dreariness of The Tide.

The former starts with ferocious blast beats and vicious quarter note triplet riffs, while the latter harks back to Ryan’s old “rock n roll with breakdowns” approach. Ryan balances his signature vocals with the more gravely howlings of guitarist/keyboardist Joel David Lauver. From melodic sing-screaming to hair-raising shrieks, the vocal chemistry is one layer of the artistic confidence Trenches has maintained in their absence.

Slow-burning dirges like “The Death of All Mammoths” displays more of Trenches‘ chemistry, as well as this album’s immaculate production. Dyllen Jerome Nance drums have a perfect balance of clarity and grit, while new guitarists Ross Montgomery and Carey Stilts mesh well with the styles established by Lauver and bassist Bill Scott. It all sounds so dynamic and gritty, leaving room for the vocal melodies of “Lenticular Clouds” to progress from soaring harmonies to low-key musings. Ryans screams prove their versatility, adding to the emotion of the song’s melodious section and playing off Lauver‘s own harsh vocals during its final crescendo.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Trenches doubles down on their disdain for genre labels, imbuing the verses of “Empires” with an inexplicable combination of alt-rock grooves and an almost gothic gloom—in contrast to the lumbering dissonance of its central motif and a mosh part worthy the sludgecore elite (Admiral Angry style, baby!). Even a more straightforward number like “Stillness” maintains interesting songwriting chops. They know when to split their arrangements into multiple layers, and when to unite on one punishing riff. This happens without either overstaying their welcome, with multiple facets of Trenches‘ sound to manifest efficiently.

The title track’s immersive intro shows the benefit of having three guitar players, offering more ways to build upon a simple idea. It also makes the midpoint drop into a more stripped-back palm-muted riff command more attention. Trenches’ ability to keep their songs concise in their creativity makes it hard to realize the instrumental outro “Remnants” has laid the album to rest, because its echoing guitar licks and hypnotic percussion take hold so quickly.

It’s not often an album in this genre has such an easy replay value, and proves that atmospheric heavy music isn’t relegated to double LPs. Trenches didn’t need to make up for their absence with a massive undertaking. They let their songs speak for themselves, and they’re quite good! Here’s to hoping the wait for more Trenches is a bit shorter than the wait between The Tide and Reckoner.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / /

Album Review: ENTERPRISE EARTH The Chosen


Enterprise Earth, which I learned a long time ago has nothing to do with Star Trek, seems to have gone through more lineup changes than the number of red shirts killed in all three seasons of the original Star Trek television series. Captained by lead vocalist, Dan Watson, Enterprise Earth has had a bit of a bumpy ride over the years, but certainly makes a strong statement with their newest record, The Chosen.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

“Reanimate-Disintegrate” immediately strikes me as a standout. This banger shows the band firing on all cylinders and using their musicianship to the best of their abilities. The chord progressions, the bass and the vocals are so cohesive, and that’s what’s needed in a 6+ minute deathcore song. Note also how the breakdown is not what listeners might be accustomed to – it’s a bit of a surprise in terms of how they carefully weave it in.  

Admittedly, I like this second track more than the first single, “Where Dreams Are Broken.” Not that it doesn’t grab you, because it does, but it doesn’t have quite as much depth and originality as “Reanimate-Disintegrate.” Personally, my dreams were broken a long time ago, so maybe it’s just me.

The title track, unleashes some absolutely beautiful soloing and breathtaking vocal harmonies. That sounds weird for this genre, especially for those of us over 40. But Enterprise Earth makes it work. The lovely outro that gives more low end than Snoop Dogg rollin’ in his ’64 further cements my adoration for this song. Some of the tracks following, however, are a bit more generic. It’s good to be familiar, but there also needs to be more nuance and texture to keep this band moving forward. “I Have to Escape,” for example, is a song we’ve really heard before. Not bad, but little in terms of surprise. Add this to the fact that there are a whopping 14 tracks on the record and one has to wonder if a slightly shorter, punchy record might have been a better strategy. Sometimes this record feels like sitting through Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. It’s a bit too much.

Now, there still are some surprises on the record, I do love the clean vocals and melancholy intro of “Overpass,” which then takes us into a slightly restrained breakdown. Four minutes in are some lush guitar solos. It all works musically and emotionally. This type of song is where Enterprise Earth shines, where the listener is given something surprising… something novel. I want to hear more of this.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Those fantastic solos abound in other tracks as well, such as “You Couldn’t Save Me.” You might say it saves an otherwise lackluster song. My advice to Enterprise Earth is to take a page out of the K.K. Downing playbook and fervently embrace one of the things you do best – guitar solos!

Fans are going to love the signature heartfelt, emotive lyrics and the fact that there is some diversity on this record. Note that all three singles released so far definitely are unique and embrace a slightly different auricular composition. The latest single, “Legends Never Die,” exemplifies this.

Enterprise Earth fans are going to really enjoy this album and Dan Watson continues to grow as a vocalist in terms of both his delivery and range. This winter’s upcoming tour, where they’re featured with Fit for an Autopsy, is going to find many new fans beaming on board.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

Subtronics Unleashes Massive Debut Album ‘FRACTALS’


After over one year of production, the biggest Subtronics project to date has finally arrived on his own Cyclops Recordings: the debut full-length Subtronics album FRACTALS spans 16 one-of-a-kind tracks ranging from face-melting bass anthems to electro pop-adjacent cuts to leftfield experiments in sound.

“I’ve wanted to talk about this album for so long,” Subtronics said. “I’m overly transparent about my creative process, so not being able to share it with everyone has been an adjustment. I will say, I have poured so much emotional, mental, and sentimental weight into it. Putting such a huge project out there, something that I’ve been working on for well over a year, is kind of terrifying. I’ve reworked every detail of every track, made improvements, and built a universe around all of it. I have definitely evolved and grown with my sound design and I am beyond excited to share FRACTALS with everyone.”

FRACTALS opens with the epic “O.P.U.S.” to set the stage, a track that Subtronics said quite literally exploded out of him while he made it in one sitting. “I have no idea what happened,” he said. “I was at my desk, hitting keys aimlessly, while exploring Kontakt libraries and it brought me so much joy. Very meditative. I hope it feels as powerful emotionally for everyone else as it does for me when I hear it. Closing my eyes and turning the intro up full volume always teleports me back to where I was when I started to aimlessly play with chords during the lockdown in 2020.”

The album brings back singles “Spacetime” with NEVVE, “Gassed Up” with Zeds Dead and Flowdan, as well as fan-favorite “Griztronics II” with Griz. Other standouts on the album include “Take Flight VIP” with Sullivan King and “Into Pieces” with Grabbitz, whose vocals and contributions never seem to miss the mark. There’s also “FUNcKED” which lets Subtronics explore a bouncier side of bass music.

Check out the full album below. In addition to the release of FRACTALS, Subtronics embarks on his massive 53-date tour across North America beginning January 14 in Seattle — full dates and tickets here.

 

Photo via Rukes.com



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

MESHUGGAH Announces New Album Immutable


After a mysterious tease about new Meshuggah music coming soon, we’ve finally got confirmation – Meshuggah will release their new album Immutable on April 1. The album was mixed by Rickard Bengtsson and Staffan Karlsson, mastered Vlado Meller (Metallica, Rage Against The Machine, System Of A Down), and given fairly creepy artwork by artist Luminokaya.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Guitarist Mårten Hagström said the record is a great snapshot of where Meshuggah is at these days.

“The title fits perfectly for where we are as a band,” Mårten concludes. “We’re older now. Most of us are in our fifties now, and we’ve settled into who we are. Even though we’ve been experimenting all along, I also think we’ve been the same since day one. The way we approach things and why we still make new albums, and why we still sound the way we do, it’s immutable. Humanity is immutable, too. We commit the same mistakes over and over. And we are immutable. We do what we do, and we don’t change.”

Pre-orders will begin on January 28.

Want More Metal? Subscribe To Our Daily Newsletter

Enter your e-mail below to get a daily update with all of our headlines.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / /

Album Review: SHADOW OF INTENT Elegy


The future is fun, isn’t it? Sure, we have a resurgent pandemic, global climate crisis, and a rapidly decaying social fabric, but we can also record epic symphonic music from home with nothing but a few cables and apps! Shadow Of Intent has kicked off 2022 with one of the most over-the-top symphonic deathcore albums of all time. Elegy is essential listening if you were one of those kids that spent high school rotating between Dimmu Borgir and Whitechapel. With flawless production and a masterful balancing of the two styles, it’s a way to great start the new year

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Symphonic deathcore never seemed like an obvious matchup. One of them calls for a gritty DIY approach, while the second demands for complete LARPing insanity. Hoodies vs. Helmets, Basements vs. Castles, etc. Shadow Of Intent shred the line perfectly on Elegy, managing to get the best of both styles in the bag instead of worst, as so many others have before. They fill Elegy with blastbeat breakdowns, then put them right up alongside soaring orchestral segments. Most importantly, it never gets boring or old. Certain songs just lean further each way along the hardcore/harpsichord scale, giving us some variety over the album.

Shadow Of Intent

Holding it all together is Ben Duerr‘s voice. Duerr has become something of an underground sensation over the past few years, scoring dozens of guest spots with everyone from Aborted to Brand Of Sacrifice. It’s not difficult to see why. He bounces between gut-churning lows, followed by high black metal shrieks. This performance helps tie the deathcore and symphonic styles together, meaning Elegy just wouldn’t be the same without him. When Duerr combines forces with Whitechapel‘s Phil Bozeman on “Where Millions Come To Die,” it feels like we are witnessing a passing of the torch.

“Intensified Genocide” is the closest it gets to outright deathcore on Elegy. The last third of the album is taken by the three-part “Elegy I – Adept,” “II – Devise,” and “III – Overcome.” This is one of the most ambitious things Shadow Of Intent have ever attempted, even including 2019’s “The Dreaded Mystic Abyss.” Part I is two-and-a-half minutes of progressive buildup before it drops into a Fleshgod Apocalypse meets Rivers of Nihil mashup. Piano flourishes, jazzy bass interludes and finally choral voices take over as the song reaches peak epic. Then, it drops back into deathcore. “Elegy III- Overcome” culminates with one of the lowest growls of Ben Duerr‘s career.

Bands like Shadow Of Intent give us hope for the future. They are completely past the era of petty genre bickering and proudly wear their influence on their sleeves. Moreover, they’ve matured from a group of Halo-obsessed nerds into one of the most exciting bands in deathcore today. In fact, between this and Lorna Shore’s upcoming LP, 2022 could be the year symphonic deathcore becomes a dominant style.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / /

Album Review: WORM SHEPHERD Ritual Hymns


Blackened deathcore is more recognized and accepted than ever, as new bands jump into the fray armed with spooky riffs, symphonic melodrama and crushing breakdowns… and very disturbing vocals. Speaking of vocals, they were the best and worst thing about Worm Shepherd‘s debut In the Wake Ov Sòl. There’s a lot to love about Devin Duarte‘s over-the-top delivery, from goblin-esque shrieks to vomitorial lows, but in some places he pushed the boundaries past the realm of articulation. In this regard, Ritual Hymns offer more tasteful execution. Duarte‘s vocals have more distinction in their viciousness, as does the instrumentation.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

The blackened side of Worm Shepherd has more in common with Dimmu Borgir than Darkthrone. Luckily, these guys avoid getting too campy with their neo-classical embellishments, as heard in the enormous buildup of opening title track. What’s even more impressive is how naturally the song transitions from a harrowing shred-fest to a gut-busting breakdown. These guys aren’t about to let Lorna Shore end the blackened deathcore arms race. Still, look no further than the groovy bass line that precedes the overwhelming wall of sound of “Ov Sword and Nail” to see how Worm Shepherd have honed their craft. There’s even some nasty tech-death riffage to balance out the customary bottomless pit of guttural debauchery.

466643

Worm Shepherd doesn’t hide how clean their sound is, especially by black metal standards. After all, the down-tuned devastation that closes out both “Chalice Ov Rebirth” and “The River Ov Knives” wouldn’t hit right without the 808 drops and gated snare hits. The former’s downtempo style (that is, multiple seconds between notes and eerie soundscapes) and the latter’s lopsided slams certainly hit hard when it counts, but the non-breakdown passages have a bit more disparity of outcome.

“Chalice” works out swimmingly when Worm Shepherd switches to grandiose synth arpeggios to nimble At The Gates-ish riffs, but it’s hard not to imagine how the gloomy death doom vibes of “River” would sound with a more earthy, rustic sound. Regardless, the song’s addition of forlorn melodic singing deepens the song’s atmosphere, and the band’s musicality as a whole. Indeed, surgically precise blast beats don’t hinder the impact of mid-tempo Dissection vibes of “The Ravens Keep,” a track that also sees the vocals become a little less punishing to fit the more straightforward vibe.

Where the ridiculous extremities of In the Wake Ov Sòl sometimes overstayed their welcome, a cut like “Wilted Moon” waits for the perfect moment to overturn the song into ultra-heavy madness. Said ridiculous extremities become a complementary facet of what’s essentially a symphonic black metal track with a tech-death rhythm section.

Worm Shepherd’s artful genre combinations help keep longer cuts like “Blood Kingdom” interesting, as it leans heavily on death metal axioms—whether that’s acrobatic fretwork and machine gun drumming or bone-snapping beatdowns. A lot of it surprisingly harks back to deathcore as it existed before the Myspace takeover, with black metal manifesting more through evil atmosphere, bombastic dynamics and witchy high screams than an overt musical signature. At the very least, it normalizes starting “A Bird in the Dusk” with mournful keys and rainstorm field recordings.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

In a genre often plagued with killing time before the breakdown, Worm Shepherd packs these more involved songs with memorable, lethal ideas. Knowing when to hold onto a tremolo-picked note, when to let synths handle melody, or when to let lose a terrifying rasp before the mosh part… that’s what brings Ritual Hymns to the forefront of the blackened deathcore movement.

Worm Shepherd certainly takes a more seamless approach, but the band plays up stylistic contrast on the closing cut “Winter Sun.” It starts with precision double bass/guitar bursts, and ends with a low-and-slow chug-fest, but both passages come with support from synths more suited for a Satyricon interlude. In the same way, gravity blasts find a home within catchy tremolo riffs, and a triumphant lead even finds a foothold in the sonic fray. There’s so much going on, but never without a motif to lead from beginning to end.

While it still technically falls under the blackened deathcore umbrella, Ritual Hymns finds Worm Shepherd proving how versatile this micro-genre can be. It’s more than tunnel throat vocals, dissonant riffs and stupidly heavy breakdowns. Sure, all of that manifests on this record, alongside a more holistic display of musical chops. It plays more like a unique take on extreme metal, untethered by what’s okay or not. For a newer underground uprising, Worm Shepherd’s approach represents a definite step in the right direction.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /

FIT FOR AN AUTOPSY’s JOE BADOLATO Talks New Album & The Life Of A Heavy Metal Barber


Adapt or die. Brad Pitt said that in the greatest film in the history of films Moneyball. Don’t argue. I will fight you. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

That sentiment has been taken up with fire and fury by the ferocious forces of Fit For An Autopsy. The metal marriage of vocalist Joseph Badolato, guitarists Patrick Sheridan, Timothy Howley, and Will Putney, bassist Peter Blue Spinazola, and drummer Josean Orta Martinez uncork their sixth full length album, the diverse and pulverizingly intense Oh What the Future Holds on January 14 through our friends at Nuclear Blast

Before that momentous day we sat down with Badolato for a crash course on all things FFAA, an evolving sound and the life of a heavy metal barber.

I was a massive fan of The Sea of Tragic Beasts. I had huge expectations for Oh What the Future Holds, and it’s possible this album has surpassed them. I have to say I’m a fan of the direction of FFAA in recent years, maybe moving away from the earlier deathcore leanings a bit. It’s a lot harder to pin down now. 

I feel like when Hellbound came out, Hellbound was like a super super deathcore record. Everything was super heavy, fast, all lows and stuff. And I feel like we just kind of wanted to step a little more into that bigger sounding metal vibes with that deep heaviness that Fit For An Autopsy can bring.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

And I think that a lot of that changed when I joined the band because after I recorded the first album with Will, he saw a lot of things that my voice was able to do. And I guess in writing that next record probably kept that in mind. We kept pushing and experimenting myself through the years. And I think that’s been a really cool change for the band in general, that we still are able to keep that super heavy element, but also bring a different side of heavy. I guess within the vocals, really, there’s a lot of pain in the voice with like these really heavy, sad sounding dark chord parts. All in the feels, man.

971763

There’s one song in particular, “A Higher Level of Hate,” that has this crazy fucking breakdown in that song, but there’s also kind of like a leaning into a lot of melodic elements, a lot of groove and very atmospheric as well. There’s an ominous feeling that I thought you guys really brought in Tragic Beasts that is present here. Do you see it as being a continuation of that record in a way or, not really reinventing the wheel, because it really feels like you kind of found a place where you guys are thriving. 

Yeah, I think we found the spot where we’re trying to excel in and I think that we’re going to ride that out, but we’re also going to keep spicing it and throwing in a couple other little screwdrivers in there because we just love that. You know what I’m saying? Like, I love recording stuff with Will all the time. It’s so much fun because I get to see the ideas. He’s like I’m kind of feeling this or I like this voice. I want to hear something that doesn’t exist. And I’m sure we’ll figure it out. And so after a year of just being in quarantine and everything, we went and started recording the record, it was like that’s weird, but that’s cool. And I was like that’s fucking sick! Hell yeah.

It’s so crazy that the whole vibe you get when you’re doing the record after you’ve been off for a year and just practicing all these new things and seeing what you can bring to the table this time and then seeing what you get out of it at the end. That’s the payoff. At the end when you just hit play and you listen to that entire record and you’re just like that fuckin’ paid off. That worked, that was sick. 

Was the new record kind of a byproduct or direct result of the shutdown? You were just coming off of Tragic Beasts in 2019, so I don’t know what you were envisioning for a timeline.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Realistically we dropped that record and then we were on tour in Europe, and then we did one tour on that record. We didn’t tour that record at all. So we were just like, well fuck. I mean, we still got to write another record, and we’re definitely going to write another record. Do we do it every two years? I feel like I don’t pay attention to that shit.

I think it was really cool this time around though, because we were actually able to have a lot more time in the studio to record. I usually record an entire record in five days and it’s coming off of tour or my voice hasn’t been able to relax yet, but I came into this ready and awesome and had two weeks to do it. I did one week, flew home, then came back and did another week, and it was so much more we could have put into it, you know? 

No, I understand that. Having Will and the studio mind that he has, does that kind of make it easier or different in a way than getting a different producer, a different studio guy. Obviously he knows what you guys want, he’s a part of that vision as opposed to kind of having to lay it out. You kind of skip that whole dating process.

I think that’s the blessing right there, that not only is he an amazing songwriter and he’s just one of the best producers on the planet, and he’s also one of the coolest dudes. When I got the phone call to join Fit, I didn’t really know much about Will, but all my friends who recorded were just like wtf dude! Sick!

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

Just being able to work with him and seeing why he’s the fucking best it’s like this is why people come to you, because he has a really good vibe and you can write amazing shit together when there is two good energies working together in the room. So I really love that he pushes me to do a lot of things that either I’ve never heard or never really like tried to do, because then it’s just like this whole new voice to add to it and then to build off of for another voice. It’s crazy.

For songwriting, is there kind of a line between introspective emotions and the things that you would find during a pandemic and as a result of all this shittiness. I know Tragic Beasts kind of was like a lens to the world and different societal elements and how we can be so miserable to each other. There’s a line in “Far from Heaven”, ‘they only let the light in to show us darkness is permanent’. Is there kind of that balancing line for you guys with personal songs and personal journeys, but it also can hold up a mirror to what we’re going through societally? 

A lot of it we try to write for like the broad spectrum where you can kind of apply it to yourself at any point in time. So a lot of these songs on this album specifically are just about the darkness in humanity. And we just shed that to light. It’s like, yeah, it’s dark, but it’s fucking true. But it’s really cool how you do that with all the feeling of the music and everything too, because then you really feel it. You feel what we’re talking about because the emotion, the vibe, the big broadness is there.

One thing I appreciate about you as an artist is you seem to be really having fun with it. Everything I’ve seen from the live videos and even the stuff you do on Twitch or TikTok with the cover songs, you seem like you’re having a blast.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

I’m trying not to let the pandemic win I guess at this point. People just like to stop and not do anything and be like I’m useless. No you’re not, do something. I fucking opened up a barbershop. I drove from New York to Arizona with all my stuff and fucking opened up a barbershop here, and it’s been open for almost a year and it’s doing great. My drive to work every day is an hour, so I practice in my car every single day. It’s the only time I get to practice.

My band, we don’t get to practice until right before tours. All those stupid songs just started off as like warm ups and workouts for my voice to do different things or different patterns, or be able to attack words differently. Like, I’ll say something in a different song that’s so old and so awesome. And I’m just like, Wow, the way that word was said could be so cool on this bar. It’s just crazy what you can do with things. So yeah, I kept myself productive and I couldn’t be bored and let the pandemic win.

For you opening up a barbershop, that’s something you probably wouldn’t have had time or desire to do if you were on the road full time, right?

I was living in Long Island, New York for like a super long time, but I wanted to eventually move out here to Arizona to be closer to my family. My family’s been out here and I’ve been in New York since I was like 17 by myself, so I got real bored of being by myself. So I was like, this pandemic sucks. I kind of want to just go see my mom and be with my family. So I moved out here and then me and my friend Eric, he used to play in a band called No Zodiac. So he was the drummer. We took No Zodiac out on tour like five or six years ago, and we found out we were both barbers and just have kept in contact ever since.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

And when I told him that I was going to make the move out here I brought him the idea of like, maybe we should open up a fucking spot? And then he found a building right next to the Nile Theater, which is like one of the bigger venues in Arizona to play. So we share the back parking lot with all the bands. We have a backyard area that has a gate that opens, so we just open the gate for all of them and they just come in. We have kind of like a dressing room set up back there because the Nile doesn’t really have a dressing room for the support acts, so we just give them a nice big space with things like a fridge and microwaves and water and shit. Beers, monsters, all of it. 

Metal and haircuts! Do you get a lot of metalheads? Many of us don’t cut our hair much. 

You guys need your beard cleaned up. That’s most of it, because everyone always asks how’s it like touring with your tools? I’m like, I don’t really like cutting on tour because I have to separate it because when I’m home I work all day and I’m cutting all day. So when I’m on tour I don’t want to look at hair, unless you want a mullet and then, yes, I’m always down. Only if you want a mullet. Anything else I don’t want to do.

But yeah, it’s always fun. It allowed me to tour and allowed me to do whatever I want because I was able to come home and work. So that’s why a lot of people and a lot of guys in bands have become barbers over the years because you can always come home and have a job to do and you can keep your hands busy on tour if you want. I’ve been doing this shit for 10 years though, so I’m tired of doing it. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

You guys are dropping an early 2022 record, which I like to get the year kicked off right. What are you guys feeling? Because I think personally this one lives up to all the hype from The Sea of Tragic Beasts.

I personally am very confident about this. I really like this record. I really like the way everything kind of came together. I really like that all the new things and nuances that we added into this created such a big emotional rollercoaster for this whole thing.

There’s a couple of songs in there that are pretty heavy hitters that make you think a lot, and I really think that we hit it on the head with that. And I think that we really captured that vibe and that ambiance and that big feeling and that pain and feel like we captured it all on this album. So I’m really excited for everyone else to hear everything that we put into it. Literally everything that we put into it.



Source link

Related posts Tagged : / / / / /