How to Brew Shikimic Acid Tea (“spike protein detox” for Long COVID or injection recovery)


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Cashew Cream | Healthy Home Economist


Easy recipe for cashew cream using either regular or sprouted nuts that is an excellent substitute for dairy cream in soups and sauces.

homemade cashew cream recipe1 1

One of the more popular recipes on this blog is my homemade alfredo sauce which uses only four ingredients and is ready in five minutes.

Despite the rave reviews, I’ve been asked quite often how to make it without the dairy cream.

While I don’t recommend dairy substitutes from the store due to additives and packaging concerns, it is possible to make a non-dairy cream at home with whole food ingredients and very little effort.

At the top of the list is this easy cashew cream recipe below. You can use either regular or sprouted cashews.

If time is of the essence, using sprouted cashews is a bit faster. It requires less soaking to prepare the cashews for blending into a smooth puree.

Use whichever type of cashews fit your food budget and time constraints.

By the way, I have tried this cashew cream in my 4 ingredient alfredo sauce, and the results are fantastic and company tested!

cashew cream in a glass measuring cup with cashews on counter

Cashew Cream

Easy recipe for cashew cream using either regular or sprouted nuts that is an excellent substitute for dairy in soups and sauces.

Total Time 3 hours 5 minutes

Instructions

  1. Place raw cashews in a medium glass bowl.

  2. Pour one cup of filtered water over cashews in a glass bowl. This is just enough water to cover.

  3. Add sea salt and stir to mix well.

  4. Leave uncovered on counter for 3 hours. Soak for only 1 hour is using sprouted cashews.

  5. Drain promptly and rinse cashews.

  6. Place cashews in Vitamix or food processor and add 1 cup fresh filtered water.

  7. Use immediately in desired recipe. Makes 1.5 cups of cashew cream.

  8. Refrigerate leftovers for up to 4 days or freeze for later use.

Nutrition Facts

Cashew Cream

Amount Per Serving (0.24 cup)

Calories 107
Calories from Fat 72

% Daily Value*

Fat 8g12%

Saturated Fat 1.3g7%

Polyunsaturated Fat 1.3g

Monounsaturated Fat 4.6g

Potassium 120mg3%

Carbohydrates 5.3g2%

Fiber 0.7g3%

Protein 3.3g7%

Iron 1.3mg7%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

homemade cashew cream recipe



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Important Updates. My Lawsuit to Remove Travel Mask Mandate


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Organic Bread of Heaven Giveaway!


gift basket2

It’s hard to believe that two years ago this month, Healthy Home Plus was launched!

This safe, private membership community features no ads, exclusive eBook downloads, premium content (180 articles and counting!), and a private 24/7 chatbox for all your wellness questions including product/supplement vetting.

I envisioned this community for a number of years when online censorship started to rear its ugly head in 2016. It was such a relief to finally launch it in January 2020!

To celebrate Plus’ two-year anniversary, I am giving away a basket of goodies from Organic Bread of Heaven, a family-owned bakery where I’ve purchased sourdough bread, muffins, bagels, noodles, and tortillas among other items for several years.

I know that many of you enjoy their products as well!

One lucky winner from the Healthy Home Plus community will be chosen at random on January 31, 2022.

I will personally contact the winner by phone and email.

The fresh-baked basket includes the following items:

  • Turmeric Sourdough – The newest sourdough bread offering that everyone must try! The flavor is outstanding!
  • Sourdough Challah – This is what fresh sprouted bread tastes like. Compare to the imposter versionss from the store.
  • Cinnamon Sourdough Bagels – These incredible bagels are sweetened with dates!
  • Sourdough Noodles – Pasta never tasted so good or digested so well! Your choice of shape.
  • Garlic Sourdough Croutons – A blend of real sourdough breads with fresh garlic. A delicious, crunchy, and healthy addition to your favorite salads.
  • Sourdough Tortillas – I use these for tacos, quesadillas and homemade tortilla chips. Your choice of 8″ or 5″ plain or chili and herb.
  • Oatmeal Raisin Cookies – These are sweetened with maple syrup. Wonderful for the occasional treat or for children’s lunchboxes.
  • Sweet Bread – Your choice of zucchini, banana, apple, or date honey cake.

The winner will also be announced in the weekly newsletter on Tuesday, February 1, 2022!



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7 Healthy Ways to Use Matcha in the Kitchen


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Creative ways to enjoy the antioxidant goodness of matcha green tea in the home kitchen during every season of the year.

spoonful of matcha green tea powder added to a vitamix smoothie

Authentic matcha tea powder that is cultivated and produced in line with ancient Japanese custom can be an excellent addition to the diet.

I first came across this traditional green superfood while staying at a Buddhist monastery in Kyoto Japan in 1988. You can read more about the health lessons I learned on my Japanese adventure at the link.

I didn’t know what the slightly bitter, intensely uplifting dark green beverage that the monks enjoyed every morning actually was at the time.

I later discovered that they carefully cultivated, harvested, and prepared matcha powder in line with practices preserved over thousands of years!

When matcha finally made its debut in the West, I was thrilled to be able to add it to my traditional diet as an occasional remedy and energy boost that helps clear away mental cobwebs without any jitters.

This is due to the presence of L-theanine, a therapeutic amino acid that boosts mood and calms the nerves.

Its presence in tea slows the absorption of the caffeine in the matcha to a trickle. This allows you to enjoy the medicinal benefits without any downside even if you are caffeine sensitive like me.

Authentic Brands to Consider

Because matcha is technically a green powder, you have to be very careful to buy as fresh as possible.

For this reason, I prefer to buy matcha that is farm direct, meaning it does not go through the industrial food system.

However, consumers beware! There is a lot of fake matcha on the market! It is also worth the extra money to spring for organic matcha. Nonorganic has the very real potential of being quite high in fluoride.

Here are four brands to consider that I’ve vetted and used over the years.

Using Matcha in Your Kitchen

Once you have chosen a good brand of matcha and are ready to get started, here are the top ways to use it at home that I’ve found beneficial and tasty!

Tea

The most traditional way to use matcha is to simply place a teaspoon in a mug and blend with a cup of hot water. It is best to use water that is no hotter than 170 F/ 70 C.

Sifting the matcha powder first goes a long way toward preventing clumps.

Matcha Shot

If you enjoy the antioxidant bitterness of matcha, you can try it as a shot rather than a cup of tea for sipping.

Blend only a quarter cup of hot water per teaspoon of matcha.

Like with the tea method above, it’s important to keep the water lower than 170 F/ 70 C. This is especially important if you intend to chug the shot in one gulp!

These proportions dramatically increase the strong taste, which some people really enjoy.

Detox Latte

I adore sipping a fruit-sweetened matcha latte after a good breakfast on cold mornings.

Try maple syrup instead of the fruit if you prefer. Your choice of a healthy milk substitute is fine instead of dairy as well.

Iced Matcha

During hotter months, I enjoy a decaf matcha frappe in the afternoon as a cool and refreshing beverage.

You can also blend a hot matcha shot as described above with an additional cup of cold filtered water. Then pour over ice.

Smoothie

If you want the benefits of matcha but aren’t crazy about the flavor, then add a half teaspoon to your favorite smoothie.

Here are the healthy smoothie recipes I regularly use in my home if you need some ideas!

Baking

Did you know that you can add matcha powder to baked goods?

This is another way to enjoy the antioxidant benefits if you don’t particularly enjoy the bitter flavor.

The general rule of thumb is to add 1-3 teaspoons of matcha per cup of flour.

Frozen Desserts

Similar to baking, matcha is a superfood addition to frozen treats like iced cream.

I recommend only one teaspoon of matcha per cup of milk or cream so as not to compromise the intended flavor.

This raw vanilla ice cream recipe or this dairy-free peanut butter ice cream created by a friend of mine are healthy ones to consider if you haven’t made it yourself before.

Do you use matcha? What is your favorite way to enjoy its bitter, antioxidant goodness?

teaspoon of green tea matcha powder



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How I Taught My Kids Critical Thinking Skills (to protect them from dangerous health fads)


Sarah Pope has been a Health and Nutrition Educator since 2002. She is a summa cum laude graduate in Economics from Furman University and holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

She is the author of three books: the bestseller Get Your Fats Straight, Traditional Remedies for Modern Families, and Living Green in an Artificial World.

Her eBooks Real Food Fermentation, Ketonomics, and Ancestrally Inspired Dairy-Free Recipes are available for complimentary download via Healthy Home Plus.

Her mission is dedicated to helping families effectively incorporate the principles of ancestral diets within the modern household. She is a sought after lecturer around the world for conferences, summits, and podcasts.

Sarah was awarded Activist of the Year in 2010 at the International Wise Traditions Conference, subsequently serving on the Board of Directors of the nutrition nonprofit the Weston A. Price Foundation for seven years.

Her work has been covered by numerous independent and major media including USA Today, ABC, and NBC among many others.



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When Healthy Diet Triggers a Healing Crisis


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Why eating a more wholesome diet can trigger a healing crisis or a worsening of symptoms and why this should not discourage or short circuit efforts at living a healthier lifestyle.

word healing surrounded by colorful arrows

More people than ever are working to improve their diet and lifestyle. This is great news!

Unfortunately, early on in the process of making important changes, some may experience what’s called a “healing crisis”.

The risk of this happening is particularly high if lifestyle modifications are drastic.

For example, suddenly eliminating all sugar from the diet cold turkey if consumption was quite high previously can really throw the body for a loop.

The critical retracing or “die-off” may be so severe that the person may be tempted to abandon efforts to improve diet altogether!

Natural Healing Can Trigger a Temporary “Crisis”

In my 20+ years of natural health coaching, I’ve seen this process occur more times than I can count.

The truth is that natural healing first and foremost requires the body to rid itself of toxic substances. This must occur before life-improving rebuilding and health improvements gain traction.

This can translate into a temporary period of worsening symptoms. How long?

This depends on a variety of factors such as age, metabolism, severity of toxic build-up, and prior dietary quality.

Sometimes, the detoxification process can be so severe, that a person quite literally can’t leave the house for a while.

In other cases, a person in the midst of a healing crisis may mistake symptoms for actual infection or illness.

Kefir Detox

For example, just last week, a reader urgently reached out with symptoms of lightheadedness. She had just consumed some 24-hour kefir she made at home with raw, grassfed milk.

Kefir, in particular, is highly cleansing. It is the most powerful fermented food, with dozens of beneficial bacterial and yeast strains that aggressively reverse pathogenic colonization in the gut.

Using it for the first time can definitely bring on rapid detoxification as the body goes into overdrive cleansing the gut of pathogens.

Another example of A friend of mine noticed when she started drinking kefir, her eczema flared back up.  She backed down how much she was drinking and worked up slowly.

Sure enough, her eczema went away and did not reappear even consuming a quart a day! In addition, her overall health improved considerably from the introduction of raw 24-hour kefir into her diet (which was otherwise excellent).

Kombucha and Candida

Even a milder detoxifier such as kombucha can trigger yeast die-off.

While there are ways to mitigate detox symptoms (going slow is the most important one), it’s important to realize that it is normal for them to occur.

In other words, don’t panic!

Skin Ulcers

A healing crisis can also involve the skin.

One person in my wellness community experienced small, but painful, pus-filled ulcer breakouts around the elbows, knees, and hips during the first six months of the GAPS diet.

Wisely, he realized that these ulcers were a skin-based healing crisis and did not necessitate a trip to the dermatologist, who would have likely only made things worse with toxic creams or oral pharmaceuticals.

With patience and perseverance, these painful clusters gradually reduced in number, and then stopped completely. They never returned once sufficient detoxification occurred.

Rest and Keep Going! Don’t Throw in the Towel!

While a healing crisis can be inconvenient and even a bit alarming, it should not in any way serve as a source of discouragement from the inevitable progress that is right down the road!

As the body heals through diet, non-toxic therapies, and lifestyle, symptoms gradually improve and eventually fade away over time.

This may be days, weeks, or even months into the process.

Instead of being hard on yourself or abandoning positive changes, it is important to realize that a “healing crisis” is telling you that things are working.

To maximize the body’s directional energy to the organs and tissues where the most valuable healing is most likely occurring, it is important to rest as much as possible during this time.

Just like fighting an infection, releasing the body’s toxic burden can be fatiguing.

If you need to back off a bit in order to make symptoms manageable so they don’t affect work, school, or relationships, then do so.

But, by all means, be patient and stay the course!

Temporary worsening of symptoms you are working to resolve will almost certainly break through to feeling better than you ever did before!



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Tomato & Feta Cheese Dip (fast and easy!)


Easy hot dip made with cherry tomatoes, feta cheese and spices. Doubles as a thick and satisfying pasta sauce for a fast dinner.

feta and tomato dip in baking dish

A hot cheesy dip is a great way to keep the family happy until dinner is ready to be served!

My daughter came up with the recipe and everyone loves it including a neighbor who dropped in to sample it last week.

Once the dip is ready, you can serve it with your choice of dipping chips or bread.

My favorites are this recipe for baked sourdough tortilla chips or these garlic bread triangles.

Or…if you are short on time for pulling supper together, simply pour the feta and tomato dip over pasta and use it as a sauce. Dinner done!

If you go the pasta route, I recommend this line of sourdough pasta or this brand of soaked brown rice pasta for a gluten free option.

cheese tomato and feta dip in baking dish with black background

Tomato & Feta Cheese Dip

Fast and easy dip made with cherry tomatoes, feta cheese, and spices. Doubles as a thick and delicious pasta sauce.

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 F/ 204 C

  2. Place block of feta cheese in center of pan.

  3. Cut the the cherry tomatoes in half and arrange them evenly around the cheese.

  4. Drizzle the olive oil onto the cheese and tomatoes.

  5. Sprinkle the garlic, smoked paprika, sea salt and pepper onto the top of the feta.

  6. Remove pan from the oven and stir the softened feta and roasted tomatoes together until well blended.

  7. Serve immediately with choice of dipping chips, bread or pasta.

  8. When room temperature, refrigerate. Reheat to serve leftovers.

Nutrition Facts

Tomato & Feta Cheese Dip

Amount Per Serving (0.3 cup)

Calories 108
Calories from Fat 72

% Daily Value*

Fat 8g12%

Saturated Fat 6g30%

Polyunsaturated Fat 0.2g

Monounsaturated Fat 2g

Cholesterol 34mg11%

Sodium 444mg19%

Potassium 24mg1%

Carbohydrates 2g1%

Fiber 0.5g2%

Protein 6g12%

Vitamin A 150IU3%

Calcium 186mg19%

Iron 0.25mg1%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

how to make tomato and feta cheese sauce



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Vaxed Women Increasingly Shunned from Dating Scene


Sarah Pope has been a Health and Nutrition Educator since 2002. She is a summa cum laude graduate in Economics from Furman University and holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

She is the author of three books: the bestseller Get Your Fats Straight, Traditional Remedies for Modern Families, and Living Green in an Artificial World.

Her eBooks Real Food Fermentation, Ketonomics, and Ancestrally Inspired Dairy-Free Recipes are available for complimentary download via Healthy Home Plus.

Her mission is dedicated to helping families effectively incorporate the principles of ancestral diets within the modern household. She is a sought after lecturer around the world for conferences, summits, and podcasts.

Sarah was awarded Activist of the Year in 2010 at the International Wise Traditions Conference, subsequently serving on the Board of Directors of the nutrition nonprofit the Weston A. Price Foundation for seven years.

Her work has been covered by numerous independent and major media including USA Today, ABC, and NBC among many others.



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Gluten-Free Herbed Crackers | Healthy Home Economist


This simple recipe for herbed crackers uses gluten-free sprouted grain for maximum nutrition and easy digestion.

gluten free sprouted crackers on a white plate with herbed dip

Quality gluten-free crackers are hard to find even at the health food store.

The few brands that are acceptable are very expensive, to the point where making them yourself becomes a very viable option!

For example, the Simple Mills brand of crackers is one of my favorites. But, you only get roughly 68 crackers in a box that averages $4-6.

This brand of gluten-free herbal crackers is also acceptable. It is made with a whole grain blend, but prices at about $7/box and isn’t even organic.

By comparison, the recipe for gluten-free herbed crackers below produces 3 times as many crackers for roughly the same price or even a bit less!

Many people even those with excellent baking skills do not realize how simple it is to make a healthy cracker!

The process involves nothing more than sourcing gluten-free sprouted whole grain flour, blending into a batter with buttermilk and a nourishing fat like butter or coconut oil, adding some herbs and sea salt, and then rolling out the dough thinly to cut into cracker sized squares to bake at low temperature to crunchy, tasty perfection!

If you’ve been avoiding crackers because of the high price or lack of quality in most brands, try this easy recipe below. Cut it in half to make about 100 crackers for smaller households.

These crackers go well with any of these delicious healthy dips:

If you prefer a sweeter cracker, try this recipe for cinnamon sprouted crackers instead.

gluten free herbed crackers on a white plate with dip

Gluten Free Herbed Crackers

This simple recipe for herbed crackers uses gluten free sprouted whole grain for more nutrition and easier digestion.

Cook Time 3 hours 30 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 50 minutes

Instructions

  1. Mix flour with baking powder, herbs, and sea salt.

  2. Add melted butter and buttermilk and blend well by hand or with a mixer until a slightly stiff dough forms.

  3. Divide the dough into four equal parts. Roll out each quarter of the dough to 1/8 inch thickness on cookie sheet-sized pieces of unbleached parchment paper.

  4. Cut the dough into square-shaped crackers about 1×1 inch. Brush sprouted crackers with some more melted butter and carefully place parchment paper on a cookie sheet.

  5. When this process is complete for all 4 sections of dough (about 200 crackers), bake cookie sheets in a 300 F/ 150 C for 30 minutes.

  6. Reduce heat to 200 F/ 93 C and continue to bake for 3 more hours or until the herbed crackers are dry and crisp.

  7. Remove from the oven and cool. Store in airtight containers in the pantry or the refrigerator.

Nutrition Facts

Gluten Free Herbed Crackers

Amount Per Serving (8 crackers)

Calories 150
Calories from Fat 50

% Daily Value*

Fat 5.5g8%

Saturated Fat 2.7g14%

Polyunsaturated Fat 1g

Monounsaturated Fat 1.8g

Cholesterol 13mg4%

Sodium 50mg2%

Potassium 35mg1%

Carbohydrates 21g7%

Fiber 2g8%

Protein 4g8%

Vitamin A 100IU2%

Calcium 27mg3%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

sprouted gluten free crackers with herbed cream cheese dip on wooden background



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How to Make Fresh Cream Cheese


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How to make fresh cream cheese from whole milk that can be used as a nutritious ingredient in both savory and sweet dishes.

how to make cream cheese at home

Cream cheese is an important item in the kitchen for making dips, spreads, sauces, and desserts.

However, the highly processed versions from the store are best avoided.

Not only is the milk and cream used to make it pasteurized to the point where it is basically indigestible, but gum additives such as carob bean are also typically added to give it the natural body lost during manufacturing.

This is true even for organic brands.

These ingredients can serve as a trigger for digestive inflammation and uncomfortable symptoms for those that are sensitive.

You will be delighted to learn that making your own cream cheese is quite simple, in fact!

All you need is a quart of whole milk, fresh from the cow, and you are ready to proceed!

Find a local dairy farmer near you by checking the listings at realmilk.com

I’ve been making my own cream cheese from freshly clabbered milk for over twenty years now. Here are a few of my favorite recipes that call for cream cheese:

Chili and Cream Cheese Dip

Raw No-Bake Cheesecake

Grassfed Beef Stroganoff

Gluten-free Carrot Cake

I also enjoy blending homemade cream cheese with strawberries and a drizzle of maple syrup for a yummy spread for sourdough bagels. It also tastes great on these low-carb, grain-free bagels.

Texture, Taste and Shelf-life

Note that the texture of cream cheese you make yourself is softer than the gum-enhanced fake versions from the store.

It also has a slight sourness typical of probiotic-rich fermented foods.

Sweetening it for cheesecake or a bagel spread eliminates this issue completely according to my taste buds. I’ve even used it to make cream cheese frosting with excellent tasting results.

This fresh cream cheese will not last as long as processed store versions. Be sure to refrigerate right after you make it and use within about a week.

If you do not have farm fresh milk available in your area, try this recipe for making cream cheese from pasteurized milk instead.

homemade cream cheese in a stainless dish with spoon

Fresh Cream Cheese Recipe

How to make fresh cream cheese from clabbered whole milk that can be used as a spread or ingredient in both savory and sweet dishes.

Total Time 2 days 2 hours

Instructions

  1. Allow the unpasteurized milk to sit in the sealed jug on the counter for 1-3 days at room temperature. This allows the milk to separate and transform into clabber. Note that the fresher the milk and the colder the temperature of your house, the longer this will take.

  2. Line a large glass bowl with a clean, white dishtowel that isn’t too thick. Very fine cheesecloth will also work.

  3. Gently pour the clabber into the middle of the dishtowel. Gather up the ends and fasten with a rubber band. Attach to a knob on an upper cabinet in your kitchen as shown in the picture.

  4. Let the yellowish liquid portion of the clabber (liquid whey) drip into the bowl underneath. This process will continue for an hour or two.

  5. After the dripping stops, gently take down the hanging bag and place it into a clean bowl. Scrape out the fresh cream cheese that is inside the bag into a container with a lid, and refrigerate.

  6. Pour the liquid whey from the dripping bowl into a glass mason jar, affix the lid and refrigerate. It can be used as a probiotic starter for fermented foods or added directly to smoothies.

  7. Kept refrigerated, fresh cream cheese will be good to eat for about a week.

Nutrition Facts

Fresh Cream Cheese Recipe

Amount Per Serving (1 Tbl)

Calories 50
Calories from Fat 45

% Daily Value*

Fat 5g8%

Saturated Fat 3.2g16%

Monounsaturated Fat 1.5g

Cholesterol 16mg5%

Sodium 43mg2%

Potassium 17mg0%

Protein 1g2%

Vitamin A 300IU6%

Calcium 12mg1%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

fresh raw cream cheese in a bowl on marble table



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Life and Survival Under “Unvaccinated Only” Lockdown. Heartfelt Letter from a Friend in Germany


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The post Life and Survival Under “Unvaccinated Only” Lockdown. Heartfelt Letter from a Friend in Germany appeared first on The Healthy Home Economist.



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DCF and Hospitals Tag-Teaming to Take Kids from No-Jab Parents (what to do about it)


Sarah Pope has been a Health and Nutrition Educator since 2002. She is a summa cum laude graduate in Economics from Furman University and holds a Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

She is the author of three books: the bestseller Get Your Fats Straight, Traditional Remedies for Modern Families, and Living Green in an Artificial World.

Her eBooks Real Food Fermentation, Ketonomics, and Ancestrally Inspired Dairy-Free Recipes are available for complimentary download via Healthy Home Plus.

Her mission is dedicated to helping families effectively incorporate the principles of ancestral diets within the modern household. She is a sought after lecturer around the world for conferences, summits, and podcasts.

Sarah was awarded Activist of the Year in 2010 at the International Wise Traditions Conference, subsequently serving on the Board of Directors of the nutrition nonprofit the Weston A. Price Foundation for seven years.

Her work has been covered by numerous independent and major media including USA Today, ABC, and NBC among many others.



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Healthy Home PLUS Makes a Great Gift!


Healthy Home Plus 9

When I released Healthy Home Plus in January 2020, little did I know how crazy and life-altering things were going to become a few weeks later!

As it turned out, getting this members-only area of the blog up and running proved very fortunate as it was right before Covid came on the scene and altered the everyday nature of all of our lives.

In particular, the chatbox feature of Plus has been critical for ongoing, supportive dialogue with many of you during this unpredictable era.

Members are using this handy and PRIVATE chat to request vetting of supplements, health products or food brands that they are considering buying.

Implementing immunity-supporting protocols, green living, and a traditional food philosophy very quickly to keep your family healthy both physically and mentally isn’t always a smooth road!

I’ve also used Healthy Home Plus as a forum to post important material that is getting censored elsewhere to help members stay abreast of the latest studies and treatments.

Do you have a friend or family member who could benefit from the unique features Healthy Home Plus has to offer?

If so, a subscription can make a great gift!

In addition to the chatbox available on every page of the blog (which sends your questions to my phone for immediate dialogue whenever you need it) Healthy Home Plus offers four additional features:

  • No Ads. All articles, recipes and other content on the entire Healthy Home Economist site are 100% ad-free for members.
  • 180+ Premium articles with new member-only content every week! Over 100 of these have been censored by Big Tech on social media and in search algorithms, but I’ve preserved them on Plus for all posterity.
  • Tag Favorite Content. Healthy Home Plus allows you to tag individual articles and recipes as your favorites so you can easily find them later. It’s like a digital recipe book…faster and easier than printing, and saves trees too!
  • eBook Library. Members get access to my growing eBook library with download option to the reading device of your choice.

I’ve been getting fantastic feedback from those of you who have already joined. See a few of the testimonials below or on the Healthy Home Plus page.

I hope you’ll take a look and consider it too either for yourself or someone you love!

Click here to sign up or learn more!

testimonials



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How to Sprout an Avocado Pit (to grow a fruit-producing tree!)


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How to easily sprout the pit of an avocado to plant and grow into a fruit-producing tree. Important tips such as what types of avocados work best and other tricks I’ve learned over the years so that your time and effort prove “fruitful”!

sprouted avocado pit in glass jar suspended with toothpicks in water

Avocados are one of the healthiest fruits to eat due to the large quantity of nourishing fats in avocado oil.

Since one of my favorite healthy breakfasts is easy and fast avocado toast, our family can go through quite a few avocados every month!

What to do with all those avocado pits?

It seems wasteful, at least to me, to just pitch them into the trash.

Composting the avocado pits to make nutritious mulch for your garden or potted plants is, at the very least, a good way to go.

Why Sprout an Avocado Pit?

If you live in a warm and semi-humid location with mild winters, then sprouting avocado pits to then plant and grow into a tree is my favorite way to go!

If you live in a cold environment, you can still sprout the pits and plant in a large pot for the porch or patio.

The tree won’t ever produce fruit this way, but you can create a lovely dwarf tree for ambiance and a fun conversation starter when friends come over.

If you already have an avocado tree or two in the yard, then give the prepared pits that are ready to sprout as gifts instead!

What Varieties Work Best

If you look around the supermarket or health food store, Hass avocados from Mexico are the most popular type available.

Farmers’ markets and locally owned health food stores or produce stands tend to offer more varieties.

Supermarket Avocados Don’t Easily Sprout

Unfortunately, I’ve not had much luck sprouting pits from commercial Hass avocadoes even when organically grown.

This isn’t to say that Hass will never sprout. I HAVE sprouted a few here and there. But, by and large, my attempts to sprout avocados from the supermarket don’t tend to be successful.

I don’t really understand why this is, to be honest.

My best guess is that avocados that pass through the industrial food system are irradiated or treated with something that prevents the pit from sprouting. In other words, commercial avocados seem to be sterilized somehow.

I do not have any evidence to back this up … if you know of some, please post links in the comments!

Locally Grown Work Best

In my experience, locally grown avocados from a small, independent health food store or fruit from a farmers’ market almost never fail to sprout.

Since I live in Florida, that means that the pits from Florida avocados are very fertile and sprout readily.

The picture above is of a Florida avocado that I sprouted on the kitchen counter. It will be ready to plant very soon!

Wherever you live, try to find avocados that are grown within your community or within a few hundred miles and trucked in directly from the farm.

Again, it is my hunch that the reason these are most fertile is that the avocados come to you direct, bypassing the industrial food system.

There is no intervening step where the avocados are subjected to some sort of “safety processing” that eliminates the fertility of the pit.

How to Sprout and Grow an Avocado Pit into a Tree

Once you have an avocado available at home that you’d like to sprout, here are the steps to take.

Sprouting the Pit

  1. Remove the pit from an avocado that has been carefully sliced open.
  2. Wash the pit gently in cool filtered water. Do not use soap and do not use tap water, which is chlorinated and will kill the protective probiotics on the surface of the pit.
  3. Dry the pit with a clean cotton dishcloth.
  4. Take three wooden (NOT plastic) tooth picks and insert at 120 degree angles at the midsection of the pit. The widest part of the pit should be vertically pointing to the ground. See picture above for specifics.
  5. Suspend the pit on the rim of a small glass jar and add filtered spring water (NOT tap or RO which is devoid of minerals) to the point where the water level is just below the toothpicks. About half the pit should be submerged.
  6. Leave on the kitchen counter that gets indirect sunlight only. A window sill, the top of a refrigerator or a dark cabinet are not choices that are likely to be successful.
  7. Top up the glass with more filtered water as needed. Refresh all the water in the glass once a week.
  8. Within 4-12 weeks, a crack will start forming on the avocado pit and a sprout and roots will begin to emerge. The stem on the pit in the photo above appeared during the sixth week. The stem and roots may not appear at the same time.

Growing into a Tree

  1. When the sprout is about 6 inches long and the roots well developed (at least 2-3 inches long), carefully remove the toothpicks and plant the pit in soil in a medium sized pot. The top of the pit should be level with the surface of the soil.
  2. Place the pot in a sunny location (east/west window or outside location on the patio or porch is ideal). Water frequently enough to keep the soil moist (not wet or dry). Fertilize twice a month with organic houseplant fertilizer during spring and summer.
  3. Repot the avocado tree once it becomes too large for the starter pot. Use a larger container or (best) replant in your yard as desired.
  4. If you keep the tree potted, it will remain small and never produce fruit. It will be a lovely tree nonetheless!
  5. If you replant in your yard and regularly fertilize, the rapidly growing tree will begin producing avocados within about 3-5 years. Remember, an avocado tree with plenty of room will eventually grow about 40 feet tall, so plant it away from the house and other trees with that in mind.

Have you sprouted an avocado tree from a pit before? What variety did you use and where did you purchase the fertile avocado?

how to grow avocado pits



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Gingerbread Cookie Cake | Healthy Home Economist


Gingerbread cookie cake made the old-fashioned way with healthy ingredients like molasses and whole grain flour.

healthy gingerbread cookie cake recipe1

I always make my Grandmother’s gingerbread cookie recipe right before Christmas.

It’s a special treat and one of the healthiest to make as it contains a large amount of iron-rich blackstrap molasses. This is the ingredient when combined with spices that give it such a distinctive flavor.

Now that the kids are older and no longer interested in decorating the Holiday shapes with homemade butter frosting, I tend to prefer to make the dough into gingerbread cookie cake instead.

This saves quite a bit of time as shaping the dough with cookie cutters takes more time than making the batter.

The kids don’t mind one bit.

Once baked, I simply slice the cake into cookie-sized bars and serve as usual!

healthy gingerbread cookie cake made with molasses in a stainless steel pan

Gingerbread Cookie Cake

Gingerbread cookie cake made the old-fashioned way with only wholesome ingredients.

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F/ 177 C.

  2. Warm coconut oil in a small pan on the stovetop and blend with sugar in a glass mixing bowl. Mix in molasses and beaten eggs.

  3. Use the leftover drips of coconut oil in the warmed pan to grease the pizza pan.

  4. Sift flour with baking soda and spices and blend into wet ingredients one cup at a time until all the flour is used.

  5. Add optional water if the dough gets too thick and is difficult to blend.

  6. Roll out dough to 1/4″ thickness on a large, greased pizza pan.

  7. Bake for 20 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

  8. Store in airtight containers on the counter for up to a week with one slice of bread on top of the cookies to keep them moist.

molasses gingerbread cake with gingerbread boy cutout in center of baking pan



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